Question: What Factors Affect TLC?

What factors affect chromatography?

Retention factor values in thin layer chromatography are affected by the absorbent, the solvent, the chromatography plate itself, application technique and the temperature of the solvent and plate..

What 3 factors affect the rate at which pigments migrate?

Key Concepts I: Plant Pigment Chromatography The molecules migrate, or move up the paper, at different rates because of differences in solubility, molecular mass, and hydrogen bonding with the paper.

How do you increase Rf value?

The stronger a compound is bound to the adsorbent , the slower it moves up the TLC plate. Non-polar compounds move up the plate most rapidly (higher Rf value), whereas polar substances travel up the TLC plate slowly or not at all (lower Rf value).

Why is RF less than 1?

By definition, Rf values are always less than 1. An Rf value of 1 or too close to it means that the spot and the solvent front travel close together and is therefore unreliable. This happens when the eluting solvent is too polar for the sample.

What makes a good solvent for TLC?

The most common solvent mixture is hexanes (or cyclohexane, pentane or petroleum ether- they are all good substitutes for hexanes and are all weak solvents) and ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate is the strong solvent and it is more polar than the others.

Why silica gel is used in TLC?

Silica gel is by far the most widely used adsorbent and remains the dominant stationary phase for TLC. … The surface of silica gel with the highest concentration of geminal and associated silanols is favored most for the chromatography of basic compounds because these silanols are less acidic.

What are the limitations of TLC?

Limitations of TLC Although it is a very simple and convenient technique, one of its limitations is that it cannot tell the difference between enantiomers and some isomers. Another disadvantage of TLC is that in order to identify specific compounds, the Rf values for the compounds of interest must be known beforehand.

What does a TLC plate tell you?

Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) is a separation technique requiring very little sample. It is primarily used to determine the purity of a compound. A pure solid will show only one spot on a developed TLC plate. In addition, tentative identification of the unknown compound can be made through TLC analysis.

What are 3 factors that can affect RF values in TLC?

Rf values and reproducibility can be affected by a number of different factors such as layer thickness, moisture on the TLC plate, vessel saturation, temperature, depth of mobile phase, nature of the TLC plate, sample size, and solvent parameters. These effects normally cause an increase in Rf values.

What is retention factor in TLC?

The retention factor, or Rf, is defined as the distance traveled by the compound divided by the distance traveled by the solvent. … The larger an Rf of a compound, the larger the distance it travels on the TLC plate.

What factors affect the separation of pigments?

The factors involved in the separation of pigments are the solvent and the amount of hydrogen bonding the pigment has to the cellulose. Chlorophylls contain oxygen and nitrogen bonds, which hold more tightly to the paper; it does not make up as much as carotene, which does not form hydrogen bonds.

Does changing solvent change Rf value?

Yes. In fact, unless the intermolecular forces of the solvents you are using are very similar to each other, you should expect a change in the Rf value because it completely depends on the interaction of your eluent with mobile (solvent) and stationary phase.

Does RF value change with different solvents?

As, mentioned by Jan Increasing the polarity of solvent will result in increase in Rf value as the compound in even for polar or nonpolar compound, this is the rule of thumb in most cases, may be except do exist i don’t know about it. But for my experience in the laboratory polarity result increase in Rf value.

What is the importance of retention factor?

Retention factors are useful in comparing the results of one chromatogram to the results of another. If the conditions in which the chromatogram are run are unchanged (same mobile and stationary phases), the retention factor for a given material should remain constant.