Quick Answer: How Do You Keep Fence Posts From Rotting In Concrete?

What should I put between wood and concrete?

In most cases, either pressure-treated lumber or naturally durable lumber (defined by the IRC as the heartwood of redwood, cedar, black locust, and black walnut) is acceptable.

In some cases, separating wood from concrete with a water-impervious membrane or vapor retarder is all that’s required..

How do you protect a wooden post from rotting in the ground?

Tamp down the gravel. You can use concrete, if desired, but the moisture in the concrete can sometimes cause wooden posts to rot more quickly, while the gravel allows water to drain quickly away from the fence post and into the soil.

How long will a 4×4 post last in concrete?

But young pressure-treated decks, many less than 10 years old, are being shoveled into landfills. Click to see full answer. Then, how long does a 4×4 post last? Depending on the species, cedar may last for about 15-30 years, spruce may last for about 4-7 years, and pine may last for about 5-12 years.

What is the life expectancy of pressure treated wood?

40 yearsPressure-treated lumber is ideal for outdoor construction as it has a long, useful life span and is much less expensive than alternatives. Treated wood can last more than 40 years.

Does wood rot in concrete?

When wood is kept in direct contact with concrete, the moisture in the concrete will be drawn up into the wood, and after a period of time the wood will rot. … when concrete is freshly placed it begins its drying process. when wood is in contact with the concrete, the concrete leaches out its water into the wood.

How long will a pressure treated post last in the ground?

40 yearsTherefore, if you are in the look for proper construction materials for your home, then consider investing in pressure treated wood. According to Forest Products Laboratory and other research agencies, pressure treated poles in the ground can stay up to 40 years without any signs of rot.

How long will pressure treated posts last in concrete?

5 to 10 years5 Answers. A PT post will last a long time in concrete, maybe 5 to 10 years in soil alone. I suggest you embed the post in concrete, trowel a peak around the post so water runs off, and don’t let the PT post come in contact with the ground.

Why deck posts should not be set in concrete?

When concrete is poured around a deck post in this way, the post will rot due to moisture buildup by the soil. … Concrete tends to absorb moisture and wood expands when it gets wet, so these two factors combined will result in the wood breaking the concrete.

How long will a 6×6 post last in concrete?

40 yearsThe treated post that are rated for ground contact are guaranteed for 40 years.

How many bags of concrete do I need for a 4×4 post?

Mix two 50lb bags of concrete with water in a mixing tub or 5-gallon bucket. Add concrete into the hole and around the 4” x 4”. Depending on your climate, let concrete set up for 24 – 48 hours.

How do you keep concrete from rotting?

Using a metal post anchor set in concrete is probably the most effective method for achieving maximum longevity. To help keep the post from wicking water, choose an anchor that spaces the post bottom away from the concrete. Anchors are readily available and are typically used for deck-support applications.

How long will wooden posts last in concrete?

5-8 yearsThe guy who originally put them in says they typically ‘go’ between 5-8 years and is recommending I replace with concrete posts at considerable extra cost.

How long will a pressure treated 4×4 post last in the ground?

The Forest Products Laboratory and other research groups have shown that treated wood stakes placed in the ground for more than 40 years remain rot-free. But young pressure-treated decks, many less than 10 years old, are being shoveled into landfills.

Will fence posts rot in concrete?

Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts. With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow. … First, the posts should be set on top of a bed of coarse gravel 3 to 6 inches deep, so the base of the post is in contact with the gravel.

Will pressure treated wood rot if buried?

Pressure-Treated Wood Makes the Grade Pressure-treated wood in contact with the ground needs the most protection, and will rot in just a few years if you use the wrong grade. … If your wood will touch the ground or be buried, you should get the highest grade you can, up to .

Should wood posts be set in concrete?

First rule, gang: Do not set wooden posts in concrete. Look, no matter what preventative steps you take (and I’ll get to those), eventually wooden posts rot, and eventually you’ll have to set new ones. Not only does burying them in concrete make for more work down the line, it actually can speed up the rotting.

Can pressure treated wood sit on the ground?

Pressure-treated wood is softwood lumber, typically southern yellow pine, that’s been chemically treated to resist rot, decay and termites. Lumber treated to “Ground Contact” has a high chemical retention level and can be placed directly on or in the ground with better protection against rot or decay.

Do fence posts need concrete?

Concrete is the most secure material for setting fence posts, especially if you have sandy soil. Gravel may be okay with dense, clay-heavy soil, but in looser soil, concrete is the only thing that will truly keep your fence posts stuck in place.

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

The minimum depth that you should dig your fence post holes for panel sections is 2 feet. A general formula is to dig the holes one-third to one-half of the post’s aboveground height. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has, but you must also purchase longer posts.

How do I protect my post from rotting?

Placing a thick layer of loose gravel at the bottom of the post hole will allow groundwater to trickle through the rocks and down away from the base of the post. This will prevent the post from rotting by keeping it constantly dry. You can purchase gravel at a local hardware store or landscaping-supply business.